Tag Archive: brain science education

Avoid The Conference Zombie Zone

Tweet Do your conference’s education efforts result in the living dead or do they create life-transforming moments? Meeting professionals who understand Evidence Based Education (EBE)—the science and evidence on learning –and those who apply EBE strategies derived from the research, will find their conference education efforts becoming more effective and exciting. Here is the slide…

It Is Time To Hold Conference Speakers More Accountable

Tweet It’s time to hold speakers accountable for attendee learning, not just completed evaluation smile sheets! It’s time to encourage conference speakers to consciously improve. And if we want our conference speakers to improve, we need to provide them with information that shows where they need to improve and how to improve. What Product Does…

Just Because You Speak Does Not Mean Your Audience Learns: Eight Presenter Principles To Master

Tweet photography by kris krüg Most speakers are really good at talking! But talking to your audience does not mean that your audience is learning. Our Brains Have Limits As speakers, we have assumed that talking to an audience results in their learning. We think that their minds are like sponges absorbing what we are…

Overcoming These Six Barriers To Audience Resistance To Participation

Tweet Even when you’ve adequately communicated the transition from passive attendee to active participant, some audience members will still resist. You’re challenging their comfort zone of passively sitting in a lecture. You are now asking them to engage on a different level which requires being fully present and doing something. And you’re challenging their past…

Why Speakers And Attendees Resist Participant-Centered Education

Tweet Once you as the conference organizer are convinced that you want to move your education to more learner centric approaches, with a focus on the attendee as participant and learner, you may discover that your speakers do not respond with the same zeal. In reality, speakers and attendees may resist the new approach both…